The Main Governing Bodies in Online Gaming

A number of self proclaimed governing bodies have been established within the online gaming industry within recent years, causing some confusion amongst online gaming customers. We profile three of the leading governing bodies in order to clarify the options available to the customer should the worst ever happen to them.

eCogra

A London based non-profit making organisation that provides a framework for best operational practice requirements. Online gaming companies are invited to achieve accreditation, earning the eCogra seal of approval should they be successful. eCogra focus on player protection and ensuring games are true and fair.

IBAS

The International Betting and Adjudication Service (IBAS) offer a dispute resolution service for customers and gaming companies. IBAS will adjudicate on disputes bought to them, and will assist where deadlocks exist between gaming companies and their customers. Based in London.

EBA

The European Betting Association (EGB) is a not-for-profit organisation that has been established by some of the world’s leading online gaming operators, including industry giants such as PartyGaming and Bwin. Based in Brussels.

Customers that have disputes with online gaming JOKER123 companies therefore have a number of external third party organisations they can approach should a dispute ever arise. However, in all cases, the governing bodies will insist that the customer follows the internal complaints procedure of the gaming companies first. Only when an unsatisfactory conclusion has been reached should the customer, or in some cases, the gaming company, approach one of the governing bodies.

Issues that lead to dispute can vary greatly, but statistics released by the governing bodies indicate that the use of bonus codes by online companies (such as PKR codes)are typically not an issue of dispute, particularly when detailed Terms and Conditions are made clearly available to the customer. Of greater concern appears to be the delay some online operators impose on customer withdrawals. In some cases this can run into weeks, which not only appears unreasonable, but also raises questions on ethical grounds.

Despite customer numbers increasing year on year, complaints brought against gaming companies has grown at a slower than expected rate. Gaming organisations argue they have improved internal complaint procedures, yet some governing bodies state that many customers simply change to another gaming provider, rather than be tied up unnecessarily for months attempting to resolve a dispute they feel they have no chance of successfully resolving.